DPN Tutorial

DPN Tips & Tricks as discussed in Episode 17 - Wrangling the DPNs
feel free to share your own tips & tricks or to ask questions in the comments





















Getting Started:

Cast on all the stitches to one needle






















Redistribute the stitches among the other needles starting with the first cast-on stitch



Join in the round being careful not to twist - make sure the bumps all point inward and are not wrapped around the other sides of the needles


 




















Join the round using needle #4 to work the first few stitches in the round.




Move first few stitches to empty needle, place marker, then move last cast on stitch over as well.


Continue across the stitches, keeping the working needles above the points of the resting needles.  Remember - the first few rounds will be a bit fiddly until you have more knitted fabric to keep the needles steadier.




















General Tips:

If it's your first time knitting with double-pointed needles (DPNs), try them out with a thicker yarn and larger needles.  Then go down to the smaller yarn & needles once you have the hang of it.

Use a "stickier" needle - wood or bamboo - as opposed to a slick metal needle.  Once you're more comfortable, then switch to the slicker needle if you prefer.

To create stockinette stitch in the round - knit every stitch, every round.

To create garter stitch in the round - knit 1 round; purl 1 round; repeat as desired

Advanced: If ever you find yourself short a needle for the set, substitute a size smaller or larger (only go up or down one size) for the missing needle.  Because you are carrying the needles around the knitting, the one different needle will not make a noticeable difference.

1 comment:

  1. Good tutorial! I think it covered all the highlights. I wish I'd had it when I first started using DPNs.

    One thing I would add us that it looks like you are using the 5" needles? I found it most helpful to use needles as short as I could. It seemed less fiddly.

    An important I just learned was that my nickel plated needles were way too heavy for a lightweight yarn. When I switched to wooden needles, my quality went up.

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